Public transport is often unreliable and subject to delays and cancellations, whether they’re on strike or not.

There’s a limited amount you can do when your usual commute is disrupted and subject to long delays that are out of your control.

You can make your commute easier, stay productive and keep working with a little planning and organisation.

Arrange to work from home for the day – if you’re able to work flexibly, work from home on strike days.

a) you’ll save the commuting time and the inevitable delays.

b) you’ll probably get a lot more done without the usual distractions an interruptions.

Just remember to take what you need with you the night before.

Leave early/late – you may already have an early start, especially if you have a long daily commute into work. Aim to get an earlier train than normal. Although others may have the same idea, at least you have more of a chance of arriving on time, if trains are cancelled.

Avoid peak times. They’ll already be busy and made worse by any delays or cancellations. If you can avoid the rush you could reduce the time you spend travelling or waiting.

Reschedule meetings – if feasible, reschedule any meetings you may have booked on strike days.

Check ahead if these are known in advance. You may have little control over your travel time, so don’t add to the stress and pressure by being late or missing meetings as a result.

Go virtual – if you had face to face meetings planned, use virtual meeting applications like Skype, Google Hangouts or FaceTime. You’ll eliminate travel time and still get things done. A good option in many situations where face to face meetings aren’t always necessary.

Walk or cycle – can you increase your options or reduce your delays by taking the bus, cycling or walking part or all of the way? Obviously not always practical on longer journeys.

Many people find an alternate means of transport they actually prefer. One client found their walk to work wasn’t actually as far as they thought and it didn’t take them that much longer to get to work. The added exercise was a bonus.

Use the time you spend waiting to check emails, catch up on phone calls or reading.

Long delays and cancellations may be inevitable but you can always make the most of the time.